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 Subject : Re:Prospective US Employment Opportunities Enquiry.. 12/04/2022 01:37:31 PM 
Jenny Tommos
Posts: 23
Location
Forum : Seeking Employment
Topic : Prospective US Employment Opportunities Enquiry

Hi Lawrence!

I'm in NYC, I've built models for architects and scenic designers here for the last 18 years.

Advice that comes to mind:

Work permit:
Unless you have a work permit allowing you to work legally in the US, think twice before moving here.

Positions advertised:
UK modelmakers are more organized, professional and established, judging by what postings I see on LinkedIn every week and on the 4D job page. Maybe it's because there are two very good modelmaking schools in the UK, there is an 'after market' for these highly skilled graduates in architecture, film/TV, special effects. US LinkedIn job postings are predominantly for in-house machinists and industrial prototypes.
There is interesting work being done in the US, but it's never broadcast in job ads, and it's 100% networking.
If working in special effects, consider Los Angeles, a film industry town.
There is also a union for model makers on the west coast, unlike the east coast Local USA 829 union, who pretends model making doesn't exist as a profession.

Feel free to join Model Makers Guild of New York on LinkedIn, and post and browse there. https://www.linkedin.com/groups/9171408/

It sounds like you have gotten a very good start to your career in the UK. My advice would be to continue building your career there before trying to jump across the pond.

Best of luck,
Jenny Tommos
 Subject : Prospective US Employment Opportunities Enquiry.. 12/04/2022 08:59:53 AM 
Lawrence McMillan
Posts: 2
Location: UK
Forum : Seeking Employment
Topic : Prospective US Employment Opportunities Enquiry

Dear APMM Members,
My name in Lawrence McMillan and I was the winner of the APMM 2021 Art Hedlund competition with my Japanese Karakuri archer automaton. I currently live in the UK, but for personal reasons I am looking to move to the USA and further my career in model making, sculpting and Special Effects.
I am reaching out to the APMM membership in the hopes that someone might be able to link me up with an opportunity of any kind of creative work in the New York area. Since graduating from the University of Hertfordshire in 2021, I have worked in the film industry in construction sculpting on various film and television productions, and I have now moved into the SFX breakaway department where I am developing my skills.
Please find attached my website and resume.
Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Lawrence McMillan
Tel: +447845552097

Email: [email protected]

Website: lawrencemcmillan.com
 Subject : Gel depositing printing.. 10/27/2022 12:43:59 PM 
Jenny Tommos
Posts: 23
Location
Forum : Systems, Equipment, & Software
Topic : Gel depositing printing

Has anyone worked with GDP, gel depositing printing?

Huge prints, super fast, apparently.
Sounds like a hybrid of FDM and resin printing. A gel is extruded by a printer head, and a UV light cures it immediately.

A friend in Dubai saw this in action, sounds promising, since size and speed are still the serious limits of 3D printing.

https://massivit3d.com/solutions/3d-printers/
 Subject : Re:Research for my Dissertation.. 10/25/2022 12:39:41 PM 
BRUCE WILLEY
Posts: 25
Location
Forum : Students
Topic : Research for my Dissertation

Hi Jack,

I found out about model making through a friend who was in the program at Bemidji State University (BSU) run by Art Hedlund. The program utilized the shop spaces, equipment and instructors for training shop teachers. There was a Bachelor of Arts and maybe Science available, but I already had a BA so I took the classes I needed to get work and found a job. That was quite easy to do in the early '90s. BSU's program taught me about wood and metal shop equipment and forming plastics, along with molding and casting and electronics. Art's own model making classes covered the planning model construction and finishing skills - especially for scaled architectural buildings and landscapes. Eventually I learned CAD/CAM through courses I took at community colleges after I had a job. As always, the best teacher was experience and I got 50-70 hours of that per week for much of my early career.
 Subject : Re:Re:Re:Re:Research for my Dissertation.. 10/20/2022 11:58:35 AM 
MITCH HEYNICK
Posts: 4
Location
Forum : Students
Topic : Research for my Dissertation

I backed into it full speed ahead...

Mid-seventies, out of architecture school, desperate to find a job (didn't really want one in architecture tbh), I looked at my skill set and what I was interested in and said hey, I loved to build models in school, that was one of my favorite things to do. I knew there were professional model shops out there, so I put my last arch model in the back of the car and went prospecting. I got hired by the first place I stopped, 15 minutes out from the house (but that's a whole 'nother story). I just don't think that would be possible today.

There was no degree or formal training in modelmaking in those days as far as I know, pretty much everyone I worked with came from some background like art, architecture, engineering, woodworking etc. Thanks to a great manual-skills program in my junior high school back in the day (woodworking, metalworking, drafting) plus a lot of time working with tools on other projects, I had already some skills in machining etc. The rest I learned on the job. Ironically, I never did architectural models, I quickly gravitated to ID and engineering models and stayed with it my entire career.

Here (Switzerland), there is a great four-year apprenticeship program for architectural modelmakers. Apprentices work 4 days a week in a sponsoring company plus have one day of classes in both general studies as well as modelmaking specific subjects. But, it's limited to architectural - other types are simply not taught/recognized. People I know here who do some ID modelmaking also "learned by doing".
 Subject : Re:Re:Re:Re:Research for my Dissertation.. 10/20/2022 11:57:23 AM 
MITCH HEYNICK
Posts: 4
Location
Forum : Students
Topic : Research for my Dissertation

I backed into it full speed ahead...

Mid-seventies, out of architecture school, desperate to find a job (didn't really want one in architecture tbh), I looked at my skill set and what I was interested in and said hey, I loved to build models in school, that was one of my favorite things to do. I knew there were professional model shops out there, so I put my last arch model in the back of the car and went prospecting. I got hired by the first place I stopped, 15 minutes out from the house (but that's a whole 'nother story). I just don't think that would be possible today.

There was no degree or formal training in modelmaking in those days as far as I know, pretty much everyone I worked with came from some background like art, architecture, engineering, woodworking etc. Thanks to a great manual-skills program in my junior high school back in the day (woodworking, metalworking, drafting) plus a lot of time working with tools on other projects, I had already some skills in machining etc. The rest I learned on the job. Ironically, I never did architectural models, I quickly gravitated to ID and engineering models and stayed with it my entire career.

Here (Switzerland), there is a great four-year apprenticeship program for architectural modelmakers. Apprentices work 4 days a week in a sponsoring company plus have one day of classes in both general studies as well as modelmaking specific subjects. But, it's limited to architectural - other types are simply not taught/recognized. People I know here who do some ID modelmaking also "learned by doing".
 Subject : Re:Re:Re:Re:Research for my Dissertation.. 10/20/2022 11:51:06 AM 
Alika Brooks
Posts: 13
Location
Forum : Students
Topic : Research for my Dissertation

Hi Jack, I entered the model making profession around 2008 when I was studying for a degree in Industrial Design. Part of the required coursework was an internship. I did mine at a medium sized architecture firm with an in house model shop. That internship turned into a part time, then full time job. I never finished my degree. Not finishing has never hindered me, but I certainly wish that I did.
 Subject : Re:Re:Re:Research for my Dissertation.. 10/20/2022 09:59:03 AM 
MICHAEL SCRIBNER
Posts: 27
Location: Kansas City Metro
Forum : Students
Topic : Research for my Dissertation

My degree was a bachelors in Design with an emphasis on metalsmithing and jewelry design. Just so happens that my program at the University of Kansas covered everything from hand raising metal forms to welding and braising, electroplating, RTV mold making and plaster/alginate molds, lost wax casting, application of patinas and surface finishes from rough to finely polished, extensive use of all sorts of hand tools, work in a wood shop and use of various plastics and tooling boards, use of CAD/CAM software, experience with 3D printers, along with other things I've probably long since forgotten. I didn't realize it at the time, but it was a perfect primer for a broad range of model making techniques and technologies.

As for my break in to the professional space, one of the senior designers at my company had gone through the same program many years before me, and when Industrial Design was hunting for a model maker to round out their model shop, he advised the manager to check in with his old professor at KU, knowing that the jewelry program there was teaching the vast majority of skills that our prototype specialists would employ in their day to day duties. Having been a kid who was very comfortable with computers, I had taken to the CAD/CAM and 3D printing side of things more than many of my classmates, and that distinction got my name at the top of my professor's recommendation list. Everything else just kind of fell into place from there.

As for the other dozen model makers that I've worked with over the years here in my shop, only two have actual degrees in model making, from a model making program. My boss went to Art Institute of Seattle (sadly now closed), and one of my colleagues went to Bemidji State University. Dedicated model making programs in the US are very rare birds. The rest of my colleagues mostly have industrial design degrees, or design degrees in sculpture or similar disciplines. A few are traditionally trained machinists who have grown their skillsets in the workplace with exposure to other tools and systems.

I hope this is useful. Feel free to email me if you have any more specific questions.
 Subject : Re:Re:Research for my Dissertation.. 10/20/2022 09:07:02 AM 
Jenny Tommos
Posts: 23
Location
Forum : Students
Topic : Research for my Dissertation

Hi Will,
Freelance means the same thing on both sides of the Atlantic. It's just that a few members at APMM can't visualize a modelmaker jumping from gig to gig, as I do.
 Subject : Re:Research for my Dissertation.. 10/20/2022 08:55:34 AM 
Will Strange
Posts: 7
Location
Forum : Students
Topic : Research for my Dissertation

Hi Jack,

I discovered that modelmaking could be a career when I was looking for architecture and design courses to study at university. I realised I really wanted to know more about making and studied HND Design & BA (Hons) Model Design at University of Hertfordshire.

I got my first jobs through work experience / internships while I was studying. These led to plenty of freelance opportunities. After I'd gained experience I was offered a full-time position, and then became an associate in a modelmaking company.

As you'll know, I'm now a full time lecturer in both modelmaking and design, but that's another story...

All the best with your research. I hope that plenty of members can help out here.

Also: Be aware that here in the UK we have a different understanding of 'freelance'. Here, a freelancer is more likely to move from one company to another or one employer to another. I believe that in the USA, a freelancer might more often have their own workshop and work from it for different clients and other modelmakers....
 Subject : Research for my Dissertation.. 10/20/2022 08:21:46 AM 
Jack  Wase 
Posts: 1
Location
Forum : Students
Topic : Research for my Dissertation

Hi everyone,
I'm currently writing my dissertation for Modelmaking at Arts University Bournemouth regarding Modelmaking as a trade and I have a question for the community:
How did you enter the modelmaking profession and do you hold any modelmaking related qualifications, either degrees, diplomas etc?
Thank you for your time,
Jack Wase
 Subject : Re:Re:Re:Re:Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation.. 10/15/2022 08:49:15 PM 
JILL KENIK
Posts: 33
Location
Forum : Materials
Topic : Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation

Thanks for all of the suggestions!
Ended up switching out to oak over concerns about carrying the weight and that it was readily available locally.

Good idea Alika--thanks.
 Subject : Re:Re:Re:Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation.. 10/14/2022 04:14:06 PM 
Alika Brooks
Posts: 13
Location
Forum : Materials
Topic : Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation

Wood may also be a good choice. Species we use outdoors are Cedar, Cypress, Sapele, Ipe, White Oak, and treated pine. Those are all rot resistant but all wood weathers outdoors, like cracking, splitting, warping, etc. Wood finishes help but need to be reapplied regularly. Coating in epoxy is a great way to protect the wood long term but you have to protect raw epoxy from UV as well. You can use a UV stable epoxy hardener like West 207 or add a filler like aluminum powder to block the UV from degrading the epoxy.

You may also look into an architectural composite material like Richlite but I don't have any first hand experience with it.
 Subject : Re:Re:Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation.. 10/14/2022 03:59:39 PM 
EZRA HOMISON
Posts: 2
Location
Forum : Materials
Topic : Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation

I haven't used this product yet, but I noted it several years ago while looking for something else. I can't speak to its ability to support weight, but TAP's sales associates should be able to tell you more:

https://www.tapplastics.com/product/plastics/cut_to_size_plastic/king_starboard/526
Last Edited On: 10/14/2022 04:00:46 PM By EZRA HOMISON
 Subject : Re:Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation.. 10/14/2022 03:46:52 PM 
Alika Brooks
Posts: 13
Location
Forum : Materials
Topic : Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation

Hi Jill, best plastics I have experience with for outdoor use are Acrylic (PMMA) and HDPE/LDPE. We manufacture boat parts (access doors, rod holders, floor drains) for a local boat builder from King StarBoard which is HDPE. It can certainly take the outdoor weather, is easy to machine, readily available, and comes in white. It may be too flexible for you at those dimensions so best to do a test. It is also very slippery.
 Subject : Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation.. 10/14/2022 03:27:46 PM 
JILL KENIK
Posts: 33
Location
Forum : Materials
Topic : Outdoor Plastic Bar Stock--Need Recommendation

I have a project that requires 1-1/2" x 1-1/4" x 36" lengths of a plastic that can survive outdoor installation. The bar stock also needs to be able to support about 100 to 150 pounds across the 36" length. White preferred but not critical.

Various plastic bars I've reviewed all say not for outdoor use, (McMaster Carr has 5 types of correctly sized bar) so I expect that means they will break down under UV, or are not appropriate in the temperature range.

Need to be able to mill various channels into the bar on 3 sides.

Considering wood, but I am concerned about rot with the channels that need to be milled into the stock.

Any suggestions of specific type of plastic are appreciated.
 
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